Bianca Andreescu's stunning US Open victory sees her join the list of major champions: All active women's Grand Slam champions and their biggest triumphs

Hannah Wilks in WTA 13 Sep 2019
  • Bianca Andreescu becomes 15th active major champion on the WTA Tour
  • Andreescu defeated Serena Williams to win the 2019 US Open
  • All active women's Grand Slam champions profiled
Bianca Andreescu lifts the US Open trophy after defeating Serena Williams in the 2019 final (PA Sports)

Bianca Andreescu becomes Canada's first major champion at the age of 19 with US Open triumph: All active women's Grand Slam champions, profiled.


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From Open Era title leader Serena Williams to newest first-time Grand Slam champions Ashleigh Barty and Bianca Andreescu, we take a look at all the women currently playing who have captured one or more of the four Grand Slam titles.

WTA players who have won Grand Slam titles, where & when

PlayerNationalityAORGWUSOTotal
Serena WilliamsUSA7 (2003, 2005, 2009-10, 2015, 2017)3 (2002, 2013, 2015)7 (2002-3, 2009-10, 2012, 2015-16)6 (1999, 2002, 2008, 2012-14)23
Venus WilliamsUSA--5 (2000-1, 2005, 2007-8)2 (2000-1)7
Maria SharapovaRussia1 (2008)2 (2012, 2014)1 (2004)1 (2006)5
Angelique KerberGermany1 (2016)-1 (2018)1 (2016)3
Victoria AzarenkaBelarus2 (2012, 2013)---2
Simona HalepRomania-1 (2018)1 (2019)-2
Naomi OsakaJapan1 (2019)--1 (2018)2
Garbine MuguruzaSpain-1 (2016)1 (2017)-2
Petra KvitovaCzech Republic--2 (2011, 2014)-2
Svetlana KuznetsovaRussia-1 (2009)-1 (2004)2
Bianca AndreescuCanada---1 (2019)1
Ashleigh BartyAustralia-1 (2019)--1
Caroline WozniackiDenmark1 (2018)---1
Sloane StephensUSA---1 (2017)1
Jelena OstapenkoLatvia-1 (2017)--1
Samantha StosurAustralia--1 (2011)-1


Bianca Andreescu

Born: 16 June 2000 in Mississuaga, Canada

Nationality: Canadian

Plays: Right-handed, double-handed backhand

Major titles: US Open 2019 (1)

Bianca Andreescu with the US Open trophy after the 2019 women's final (PA Sports)
Bianca Andreescu is the first Canadian player to win a Grand Slam title in the Open Era, the first woman to win a Grand Slam as a teenager since Maria Sharapova at Wimbledon in 2004 and the first player born in the 2000s to win a major title.

A promising junior, Andreescu's early attempts to turn pro were stymied by injury, specifically a bad back problem which kept her off court for much of 2018. But the stage was set for a meteoric rise once Andreescu returned to competition healthy - and that's precisely what happened in 2019, a season which saw Andeescu begin it ranked outside of the top 150 but rise to world no. 5 by September.

Andreescu began 2019 by reaching the final of the ASB Classic in Auckland as a qualifier and went on to win two of the biggest WTA Tour hard-court titles, the BNP Paribas Open at Indian Wells and the Rogers Cup in Toronto, where she became the first Canadian champion in 50 years despite having only played one match since March in the run-up to the late August event due to a shoulder injury.

On her main-draw debut at the US Open, Andreescu became the first woman to win it on their first appearance, defeating two-time finalist Caroline Wozniacki and former Rogers Cup champion Belinda Bencic on her way to the final where she faced 23-time major champion Serena Williams. Andreescu came out on top, out-serving Williams and surviving a late surge from the American which saw Williams come back from 1-5 down in the second set to 5-5, saving a match point on the way, before Andreescu won the final two games of the match to close out a 6-3, 7-5 victory and claim her first major title.

Serena Williams



Nationality: American

Plays: Right-handed, double-handed backhand

Major titles: Australian Open 2003, 2005, 2009-10, 2015, 2017; French Open 2002, 2013, 2015; Wimbledon 2002-3, 2009-10, 2012, 2015-16; US Open 1999, 2002, 2008, 2012-14 (23)

The extraordinary Serena Williams continues to lead the way in women's tennis as the undisputed holder of the Open Era record for most Grand Slam titles, having surpassed Steffi Graf's total of 22 when she won the 2017 Australian Open.

Williams made her Grand Slam debut at the 1998 Australian Open and won her first major title a year and a half later at the 1999 US Open, beating opponents including Kim Clijsters, Monica Seles, Lindsay Davenport, Conchita Martinez and Martina Hingis.

She went on to complete the career Grand Slam at the 2003 Australian Open, which also marked the fourth consecutive major she had won - her first 'Serena Slam', an achievement she would repeat in 2014-15. 

Despite personal tragedy and serious health problems, Williams has won at least one major title in 14 of the 20 seasons since claiming her first Grand Slam title. She has won a record seven Open Era Australian Open titles, and a record six Open Era US Open titles. She has been world no. 1 for 319 weeks, the third highest number of weeks since computer rankings began. In addition to her 23 Grand Slam singles titles, 72 WTA Tour titles and Olympic gold medal in singles, Williams has reached nine Grand Slam finals in singles and has also won three gold medals and 14 Grand Slam titles in women's doubles. 

Williams's most recent major title came at the 2017 Australian Open, when she beat sister Venus Williams in the final despite being some weeks pregnant. Williams has reached three Grand Slam finals since returning from maternity leave in March 2018.

Venus Williams



Nationality: American

Plays: Right-handed, double-handed backhand

Major titles: Wimbledon 2000-1, 2005, 2007-8; US Open 2000-1 (7)

The elder of the two Williams sisters reached her first Grand Slam final at the 1997 US Open, where she lost to Martina Hingis. It was her debut at the tournament.

Younger sister Serena beat Venus to a maiden Grand Slam title when she, Serena, won the 1999 US Open, but Venus would follow suit less than a year later when she claimed her maiden major at Wimbledon 2000.

While Venus won back-to-back US Open titles in 2000-1, she has enjoyed most of her Grand Slam successes at Wimbledon, a tournament with which she has become closely associated with her booming serve and long strides across the court suiting the grass courts perfectly.

Williams's last Grand Slam title came at Wimbledon in 2008 when she defeated Serena in the final, but she has reached three Grand Slam finals subsequently and continued to amass WTA Tour titles, of which she has won 22, despite being diagnosed with autoimmune disorder Sjogren's Syndrome. She was the first black woman to be ranked world no. 1 in the Open Era, and holds an Olympic gold medal in singles as well as three in doubles with sister Serena, also her partner for 14 Grand Slam doubles titles. Williams is tied for third place on the Open Era Wimbledon women's champion's list behind Martina Navratilova (9) and Serena Williams and Steffi Graf (7).

Maria Sharapova



Nationality: Russian

Plays: Right-handed, double-handed backhand

Major titles: Australian Open 2008; French Open 2012, 2014; Wimbledon 2004; US Open 2006 (5)

Russia's Maria Sharapova captured the world's attention at the age of 17 when she defeated Serena Williams in straight sets to win Wimbledon in 2004, and was still a teenager when she became the first Russian woman to hold the world no.1 singles ranking in 2005. 

Sharapova, who has spent 21 total weeks as world no. 1, went on to win the US Open in 2006 (defeating Justine Henin in the final) and the Australian Open in 2008 (beating Ana Ivanovic).   

Despite once describing herself on clay as a 'cow on ice', as Sharapova's career progressed and she began to suffer from serious shoulder problems - a rotator cuff tear required surgical repair in 2008, and she also missed substantial amounts of the 2007, 2013 and 2019 seasons - clay became the Russian's strongest surface. She completed the career Grand Slam at the 2012 French Open when she beat Sara Errani, the tenth woman in the Open Era to win all four majors, and won Roland Garros for a second time in 2014 when she overcame Simona Halep in three sets.

Sharapova has not won a major title since the 2014 French Open, and made her last major final at the 2015 Australian Open, losing to Serena Williams. She was suspended for 15 months after testing positive for the prohibited substance meldonium at the 2016 Australian Open and has not ranked inside the top 20 since her comeback.

Angelique Kerber



Nationality: German

Plays: Left-handed, double-handed backhand

Major titles: Australian Open 2016, Wimbledon 2018, US Open 2016 (3)

Angelique Kerber only won one match in her first seven Grand Slam main-draw appearances but the German, a bit of a late bloomer, developed into a formidable force at the top of women's tennis.

The German, whose left-handed shotmaking is coupled with exceptional defensive and counterpunching abilities, made her first Grand Slam semifinal at the 2011 US Open, losing to eventual champion Samantha Stosur, and reached the final four at Wimbledon the following year. But three years went by before Kerber could make it to the semifinals of a major again.

She ended that drought in style, however, at the 2016 Australian Open, when she saved match points in the first round against Misaki Doi and went on to claim the title, defeating two-time champion Victoria Azarenka and becoming the first woman to beat Serena Williams in an Australian Open final. Kerber would go on to record an extraordinary season, reaching the final of Wimbledon (where she finished runner-up to Williams), rising to world no. 1 and claiming her second Grand Slam title at the US Open, defeating Karolina Pliskova in the final.

Kerber struggled to back up her 2016 achievements the following year, which saw her drop out of the top 20 and fail to win a single title, but surged back in style in 2018 when she defeated Serena Williams in the final to claim her first Wimbledon title.

The first German woman to win a major title since the legendary Steffi Graf, Kerber became the oldest woman to rank world no. 1 for the first time in 2016 and is the only woman apart from Venus Williams to have defeated Serena Williams in multiple Grand Slam finals.

Svetlana Kuznetsova



Nationality: Russian

Plays: Right-handed, double-handed backhand

Major titles: US Open 2004, French Open 2009 (2)

Part of a trio of Russian women who became Grand Slam champions in the 2000s, Svetlana Kuznetsova joined Anastasia Myskina and Maria Sharapova as in the ranks of major winners in 2004 when she won the US Open.

The powerful Kuznetsova had only once made it as far as a Grand Slam quarterfinal and was just 20 years old when she beat Nadia Petrova, Mary Pierce, Lindsay Davenport and Elena Dementieva to claim her maiden major in New York.

Kuznetsova would go on to reach Grand Slam finals at the 2006 French Open and the 2007 US Open, finishing runner-up to Justine Henin on both occasions, and reached a career-high ranking of world no. 2. 

In 2009, Kuznetsova was ranked world no. 7 when she followed a semifinal run at Roland Garros the previous year by making her second final, defeating Serena Williams in the quarterfinals and Samantha Stosur in the semifinals. She defeated compatriot (and then-world no. 1) Dinara Safina 6-4, 6-2 to claim the French Open title.

Kuznetsova has struggled with injuries in recent years but has made the quarterfinals of the French Open three times over the past decade and has continued to amass titles on the WTA Tour, currently tied with Simona Halep for seventh place among active players with most WTA Tour titles with 18. 

Victoria Azarenka



Nationality: Belarusian

Plays: Right-handed, double-handed backhand

Major titles: Australian Open 2012-13 (2)

The first and so far only Belarusian player to have won a Grand Slam title, Victoria Azarenka won back-to-back Australian Open titles in 2012-13, the eighth woman to win back-to-back Australian Open titles in the Open Era and the first since Serena Williams in 2009-10.

Azarenka won her first WTA Premier Mandatory title at the Miami Open in 2009 while still a teenager, but took a little longer to break through on the Grand Slam stage, reaching her first Grand Slam semifinal at Wimbledon in 2011 where she lost to eventual champion Petra Kvitova. Less than a year later, however, Azarenka would storm to her maiden major at the Australian Open, beating Agnieszka Radwanska and Kim Clijsters before crushing Maria Sharapova 6-3, 6-0 in the final.

Winning her first 26 matches of 2012 before Marion Bartoli snapped her winning streak in Miami, Azarenka rose to world no. 1 and reached the final of the US Open the same year before successfully defending her Australian Open title in 2013, beating Li Na in the final. Once again, she finished runner-up to Serena Williams at the US Open.

Injury, pregnancy and a custody battle have severely hampered Azarenka's career in recent years but she remains the WTA Tour's joint leader in Premier Mandatory titles alongside Serena Williams, most recently completing the Sunshine Double in 2016 - just the second woman to do so.

Petra Kvitova



Nationality: Czech

Plays: Left-handed, double-handed backhand

Major titles: Wimbledon 2011, 2014 (2)

Powerful Petra Kvitova is possessed of a booming serve and viciously flat groundstrokes off either wing which have taken her to two Wimbledon titles among other career achievements.

Kvitova first announced herself on the Grand Slam stage with a run to the Wimbledon semifinals in 2010, where she beat Caroline Wozniacki and Victoria Azarenka before falling to Serena Williams. Twelve months later, Kvitova won the title, beating Azarenka in three sets in the semifinals and defeating Maria Sharapova 6-3, 6-4 in the final to become the first Czech woman to win Wimbledon since Jana Novotna in 1998. Kvitova was the first player born in the 1990s, male or female, to win a Grand Slam title.

A semifinalist at the Australian and French Opens in 2012, Kvitova claimed her second Wimbledon title in 2014, dropping just one set on her way to the title (against Venus Williams in the third round) and allowing Eugenie Bouchard just three games in the final. 

In 2015, Kvitova became one of a small group of WTA Tour players to have made the quarterfinals at all four Grand Slams and is also a WTA Finals champion, winning the title in Istanbul in 2011, She has played a significant role in the phenomenal success of the Czech Republic's Fed Cup team (they won the title six times in eight years between 2011 and 2018) and has ranked as high as world no. 2, amassing 27 WTA Tour titles - the fifth most among active players.

Kvitova has not only battled mononucleosis but overcame even greater adversity when she was attacked during a robbery at her home in late 2016, sustaining severe knife injuries to her dominant left hand as she defended herself. Returning to competition six months later after having had her hand surgically repaired, Kvitova has risen back into the top 10 and matched her career-high ranking of world no. 2 after reaching her first Grand Slam final for five years at the Australian Open in 2019, finishing runner-up to Naomi Osaka.

Garbine Muguruza



Nationality: Spanish

Plays: Right-handed, double-handed backhand

Major titles: French Open 2016, Wimbledon 2017 (2)

Spain's Garbine Muguruza established herself as a formidable force especially on natural surfaces as she made the final or won the title at either the French Open or Wimbledon for three straight years in 2015-17.

Muguruza won her first WTA Tour title in Hobart in 2014 and announced herself on the Grand Slam stage later the same season when she defeated Serena Williams 6-2, 6-2 in the second round of the French Open, handing the American what was then her most lopsided defeat at Grand Slam level before going on to reach the quarterfinals, where she lost to Maria Sharapova.

A quarterfinalist at the French Open again in 2015, Muguruza went on to make her first major final at Wimbledon, finishing runner-up to Williams. A year later, she would have her revenge on the American at Roland Garros when she ousted the defending champion to claim her maiden Grand Slam title, having dropped just one set (to Anna Karolina Schmiedlova in the first round) in the process.

Muguruza's French Open title defense was ended in the fourth round by Kristina Mladenovic in 2017, but she went on to win Wimbledon, defeating Venus Williams in the final and going on to become world no. 1. 

Muguruza also reached the semifinals of the French Open in 2018 and has won seven WTA Tour titles.

Simona Halep


Born: 27 September 1991 in Constanta, Romania

Nationality: Romanian

Plays: Right-handed, double-handed backhand

Major titles: French Open 2018, Wimbledon 2019 (2)

Simona Halep became the first Romanian player, male or female, to claim the Wimbledon singles trophy when she triumphed at The Championships 2019.

After winning six WTA Tour titles in a single year in 2013, Halep reached her first Grand Slam singles final during her breakthrough 2014 season when she finished runner-up to Maria Sharapova at the French Open.

Halep would continue to accumulate WTA Tour singles titles but did not reach another Grand Slam final until the 2017 French Open, where she led Jelena Ostapenko by a set and a break but ultimately lost in three sets. She would end that year ranked world no. 1 for the first time.

Also denied by Caroline Wozniacki in the final of the 2018 Australian Open, Halep finally joined the ranks of major champions when she faced Sloane Stephens in the French Open final in 2018. This time, it was she who came down from a set and a break to claim the title, following in the footsteps of 1978 Roland Garros champion Virginia Ruzici, now Halep's manager.

After failing to defend her French Open title in 2019 when she was defeated in the quarterfinals by Amanda Anisimova, Halep went on to triumph at Wimbledon the same summer. Finally finding her feet on grass, she beat Coco Gauff and Elina Svitolina on her way to the final where she delivered the best performance of her career so far to defeat Serena Williams 6-2, 6-2 and claim the Wimbledon title, becoming at age 27 the eighth active WTA player to have claimed multiple major titles.


Naomi Osaka



Nationality: Japanese

Plays: Right-handed, double-handed backhand

Major titles: US Open 2018, Australian Open 2019 (2)

Japanese-Haitian player Naomi Osaka is the brightest young star in women's tennis after shooting upwards through the rankings in 2018.

Osaka, whose parents followed the example of Richard Williams, father and coach of Venus and Serena Williams, rarely played junior tennis and turned professional in 2013 at the age of 16, first raising eyebrows when she defeated then-world no. 19 Samantha Stosur in Stanford in 2014. By the end of 2016, Osaka had reached her first WTA Tour final in Tokyo and broken into the top 50. She made the third round at each of the first three Grand Slam main draws she played.

In March 2018, ranked world no. 44, Osaka won her first WTA Tour title at the Premier Mandatory-level BNP Paribas Open and went on to break into the top 20, but had still not been past the third round of a major - that is, until the US Open in August of that year, at which Osaka would win her maiden major title. She dropped just one set, against Aryna Sabalenka in the third round, and defeated 2017 runner-up Madison Keys in the semifinals and Serena Williams 6-2, 6-4 in the final.

Osaka became the first woman since Jennifer Capriati in 2001 to follow her maiden major by winning the next Grand Slam when she triumphed at the 2019 Australian Open, defeating Elina Svitolina, Karolina Pliskova and Petra Kvitova in the final. She earned the world no. 1 ranking by virtue of that victory, becoming the first woman of Asian descent to hold the top spot.

Samantha Stosur



Nationality: Australian

Plays: Right-handed, double-handed backhand

Major titles: US Open 2011 (1)

Sam Stosur's kick serve and powerful forehand saw her become the first Australian woman to win a major title since the legendary Evonne Goolagong.

Stosur's initial success came in doubles - she is a six-time Grand Slam doubles champion at the time of writing, and was ranked world no. 1 in doubles for 61 weeks - but following a brush with Lyme disease, the Australian re-committed to singles and reached her first Grand Slam singles semifinal at the French Open in 2009, losing to Svetlana Kuznetsova.

Twelve months later, Stosur would defeat four-time Roland Garros champion Justine Henin and Serena Williams on her way to her first Grand Slam final at the French Open. Stosur was defeated by Italian veteran Francesca Schiavone, but went on to make the final of the 2010 US Open and defeated Williams 6-2, 6-3 to claim her maiden major title.

Stosur ranked as high as world no. 4 and has won nine WTA Tour singles titles as well as continuing to enjoy success in doubles. Since winning the 2011 US Open, she has reached the semifinals of the French Open twice.

Jelena Ostapenko



Nationality: Latvian

Plays: Right-handed, double-handed backhand

Major titles: French Open 2017 (1)

Jelena Ostapenko became the first unseeded player to win the French Open since 1933 when she claimed her maiden major title in 2017.

Remarkably, when Ostapenko won the French Open she had never won a regular WTA Tour title. The Latvian, who was the junior Wimbledon champion in 2014 and prefers to be known as 'Alona', had reached three WTA Tour finals in 2015-17 when she came into the 2017 French Open ranked world no. 47. 

Ostapenko, who turned 20 during the fortnight, came back from a set down against former finalist Samantha Stosur and former world no. 1 Caroline Wozniacki to reach the final, where she trailed by a set and a break against Simona Halep before surging back to claim her maiden major title.

Ostapenko is the first Latvian player to win a major title. She went on to win her first WTA Tour title in Seoul in 2017 and was ranked as high as world no. 5 in 2018. She has also made the semifinals of Wimbledon.

Sloane Stephens



Nationality: American

Plays: Right-handed, double-handed backhand

Major titles: US Open 2017 (1)

Sloane Stephens became the second first-time major champion on the WTA Tour in 2017 when she won her maiden title at the US Open.

Stephens was still a teenager when she had her breakthrough on the Grand Slam stage: Ranked world no. 25 at the age of 19, Stephens made a surprise run to the semifinals of the Australian Open, defeating Serena Williams in the quarterfinals before losing to eventual champion Victoria Azarenka.

Great things were confidently predicted for Stephens, but it took time for the American to put it all together. Stephens won her first WTA Tour title in 2015 and then a trio in early 2016, but her burgeoning career was stalled by a serious foot injury which kept her off court from August 2016 and necessitated surgery in January 2017.

By the time Stephens had returned to competition in July 2017, her ranking had dropped to world no. 336 and would fall to world no. 957, but in just her third and fourth events back she made Premier-5 semifinals in Toronto and Cincinnati to come into the US Open ranked world no. 83. Stephens defeated five seeded players - Dominika Cibulkova, Julia Goerges, Anastasija Sevastova, Venus Williams and Madison Keys - to claim the title, becoming the lowest-ranked US Open champion in history and the first American, apart from the Williams sisters, to win a major title since Jennifer Capriati won the Australian Open in 2002.

Stephens would go on to reach the French Open final in 2018, finishing runner-up to Simona Halep, and the final of the WTA Finals Singapore the same year. She has been ranked as high as world no. 3. 

Caroline Wozniacki



Nationality: Danish

Plays: Right-handed, double-handed backhand

Major titles: Australian Open 2018 (1)

Few maiden major titles have been more keenly anticipated than Caroline Wozniacki's first Grand Slam victory, which came at the Australian Open in 2018 - after she had been ranked world no. 1 for the best part of a year earlier in her career.

Wozniacki, who has amassed 30 WTA Tour titles - the fourth most of any active players behind the Williams sisters and Maria Sharapova - won her first WTA Tour title in Stockholm in 2008 and reached her first Grand Slam final at the US Open in 2009, having beaten former champion Svetlana Kuznetsova on her way to the final before losing to Kim Clijsters.

Wozniacki made three Grand Slam semifinals in 2010-11 and won six WTA Tour titles in each of those seasons, and was ranked world no. 1 for almost all of 2011, finishing both 2010 and 2011 as world no. 1. 

The Dane reached her second major final at the US Open in 2014, defeating Maria Sharapova in three sets in the fourth round before finishing runner-up to Serena Williams. 

Wozniacki won her biggest title to date when she triumphed at the WTA Finals Singapore in 2017 and went on to claim her maiden major title at the Australian Open in 2018, defeating Simona Halep in an epic three-set final. The Dane briefly returned to world no. 1 as a result, bringing her total of weeks in the top spot to 71.

Ashleigh Barty



Nationality: Australian

Plays: Right-handed, double-handed backhand

Major titles: French Open 2019 (1)

Australia's Ashleigh 'Ash' Barty became the latest woman to join the ranks of the WTA's major champions when she claimed the French Open title in 2019, rising to world no. 1 a couple of weeks later.

A junior Wimbledon champion in 2011, Barty found success very swiftly after turning professional, reaching three Grand Slam doubles finals with Casey Dellacqua while still a teenager. But as an 18-year-old in 2014, Barty decided to walk away from tennis for a while, struggling with the isolation and loneliness of life on the professional tour. 

After a season playing professional cricket in Australia, Barty returned to tennis in May 2016, unranked. By the following March, she had won her first WTA Tour title and was ranked inside the top 100, ending 2017 inside the world's top 20. Winning a pair of titles in 2018 and consolidating her position inside the world's top 20, Barty pushed upwards in unstoppable style in 2019. She reached her first Grand Slam quarterfinal at the Australian Open in January, losing to Petra Kvitova, then won her biggest WTA Tour title at the Premier Mandatory-level Miami Open, breaking into the top 10 for the first time as a result.

Seeded eighth at the 2019 French Open, Barty defeated Sofia Kenin, former US Open runner-up Madison Keys, Amanda Anisimova and Marketa Vondrousova to claim her maiden major title before securing the world no. 1 ranking a couple of weeks later by winning the Nature Valley Classic in Birmingham. Barty's 15-match winning streak was ended by Alison Riske in the fourth round of Wimbledon 2019.


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Bianca Andreescu's stunning US Open victory sees her join the list of major champions: All active women's Grand Slam champions and their biggest triumphs

Bianca Andreescu became the first Canadian Grand Slam champion in the Open Era when she won the 2019 US Open: Here are all the active women's players who have lifted a Grand Slam trophy at one of the sport's four biggest events, from Serena Williams to Andreescu and Ashleigh Barty

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