Wimbledon records and stats: Greatest champions, most titles, fastest serves and more from The Championships

Hannah Wilks in Wimbledon 30 Jun 2018
  • Records and statistics from Wimbledon
  • Roger Federer has won the most men's Wimbledon titles with eight
  • Martina Navratilova has won the most women's Wimbledon titles with nine
  • Watch and bet on tennis live from Wimbledon at bet365 > live streaming > tennis (geo-restrictions apply; funded account required or to have placed a bet in the last 24 hours to qualify) 

Roger Federer holds the record for most men's Wimbledon titles in the Open Era but who has struck the most aces, hit the fastest serve and won Wimbledon saving match point? The best records and statistics from tennis's most iconic event.


Most Wimbledon titles (men)


No one in history has won more Wimbledon men's singles titles than Roger Federer of Switzerland, who has taken the title a record eight times between 2003 and 2017.

Federer's Wimbledon titles

YearOpponent in finalScoreline
2003Mark Philippoussis7-6(5), 6-2, 7-6(3)
2004Andy Roddick4-6, 7-5, 7-6(3), 6-4
2005Andy Roddick6-2, 7-6(2), 6-4
2006Rafael Nadal6-0, 7-6(5), 6-7(2), 6-3
2007Rafael Nadal7-6(7), 4-6, 7-6(3), 2-6, 6-2
2009Andy Roddick5-7, 7-6(6), 7-6(5), 3-6, 16-14
2012Andy Murray4-6, 7-5, 6-3, 6-4
2017Marin Cilic6-3, 6-1, 6-4

Behind Federer, Pete Sampras of the USA and William Renshaw of Great Britain are tied for second place on the all-time winners' list. Sampras won seven titles in the Open Era between 1993 and 2000. Renshaw was the greatest men's champion of the amateur era, winning seven titles between 1881 and 1889 (although for five of those years, Renshaw only had to win one match to defend his title - the so-called 'challenge round'.)

Twelve players have won multiple Wimbledon titles in the Open Era, with Andy Murray the most recent man to do so.

Players who have won multiple men's Wimbledon titles in the Open Era

PlayerWimbledons wonYears
Roger Federer82003-7, 2009, 2012, 2017
Pete Sampras71993-5, 1997-2000
Bjorn Borg51976-80
John McEnroe31981, 1983-4
Boris Becker31985-6, 1989
Novak Djokovic32011, 2014-15
Rod Laver21968-9
John Newcombe21970-1
Jimmy Connors21974, 1982
Stefan Edberg21988, 1990
Rafael Nadal22008, 2010
Andy Murray22013, 2016


Most Wimbledon titles (women)

Martina Navratilova


No woman has won more Wimbledon singles titles than Martina Navratilova, who won nine ladies' singles titles between 1978 and 1990. 

Helen Wills Moody is in second place on the all-time list, having won eight ladies' singles titles between 1927 and 1938.

Among active players, Serena Williams leads the way with seven Wimbledon titles between 2002 and 2016 - which also ties her for fourth place on the all-time winners' list, and second place on the Open Era list, with Steffi Graf. 

Serena Williams's Wimbledon titles

YearOpponent in finalScoreline
2002Venus Williams7-6(4), 6-3
2003Venus Williams4-6, 6-4, 6-2
2009Venus Williams7-6(3), 6-2
2010Vera Zvonareva6-3, 6-2
2012Agnieszka Radwanska6-1, 5-7, 6-2
2015Garbine Muguruza6-4, 6-4
2016Angelique Kerber7-5, 6-3

Eight women have won multiple Wimbledon titles in the Open Era - most recently Petra Kvitova, who won her second title in 2014.

Women who have won multiple Wimbledon titles in the Open Era

PlayerTitlesYears
Martina Navratilova91978-9, 1982-7, 1990
Steffi Graf71988-9, 1991-3, 1995-6
Serena Williams72002-3, 2009-10, 2012, 2015-16
Billie Jean King41968, 1972-3, 1975
Venus Williams52000-1, 2005, 2007-8
Chris Evert31974, 1976, 1981
Evonne Goolagong Cawley21971, 1980
Petra Kvitova22011, 2014

Unseeded champions

Goran Ivanisevic in 2001 (Gary M. Prior/ALLSPORT)

In the history of Wimbledon, only two players have ever won the singles title unseeded - Boris Becker of Germany in 1985 and Goran Ivanisevic of Croatia in 2001. Ivanisevic was a wildcard, ultimately defeating Patrick Rafter in a five-set final.

No unseeded woman has ever won the Wimbledon singles title (yet). Venus Williams was the lowest-seeded player ever to win the Wimbledon ladies' title - when she won her fifth title in 2007, she was seeded 23rd (defeating Marion Bartoli in the final).

Oldest and youngest champions


The youngest man ever to win Wimbledon was Boris Becker, who was 17 years and seven months when he won Wimbledon in 1985. The oldest male Wimbledon champion was Arthur Gore, who was 41 years and six months when he won Wimbledon in 1909. 

On the women's side, Lottie Dod is the youngest woman ever to have won Wimbledon, aged just 15 years and nine months in 1887, and the oldest champion was Charlotte Cooper, 37 years and eight months old when she won Wimbledon in 1908.

Winning without dropping a set


Only five male players have won Wimbledon without dropping a set: Don Budge (1938); Tony Trabert (1955); Chuck McKinley (1963); Bjorn Borg (1976) and Roger Federer (2017).
 
Fifteen different women have won Wimbledon without dropping a set, most recently Lindsay Davenport (1999), Serena Williams (2002, 2010), Venus Williams (2008) and Marion Bartoli (2013). 

Champions who saved match points  


Four men have saved match point at Wimbledon and gone on to win the title, most recently Neale Fraser in 1960.

Three women have saved match point at Wimbledon and gone on to win the title, most recently Serena Williams in 2009, who saved match point against Elena Dementieva in the semi-finals before going on to beat Venus Williams in the final.

Wimbledon serve records



Most aces (men) – Goran Ivanisevic of Croatia, who served 212 aces on his way to the title in 2001

Most aces (women) – Serena Williams of the USA, who served 102 aces on her way to the title in 2012

Most aces served in a match – John Isner of the USA, who served 113 during his 2010 epic with Nicolas Mahut

Fastest serve (men) – Taylor Dent of the USA served 148mph at Wimbledon 2010

Fastest serve (women) – Venus Williams of the USA served 129mph at Wimbledon 2008

Longest match



The longest match ever to take place at Wimbledon was John Isner's victory over Nicolas Mahut, 6-4, 3-6, 6-7 (7), 7-6 (3), 70-68, on Court 18 in 2010. The match lasted 11 hours and five minutes with the final set alone taking 8 hours, 11 minutes (longer than the previous longest recorded match in tennis history).

Wimbledon and rain



Only seven editions of Wimbledon have been played entirely without rain since records began in 1922: 1931, 1976, 1977, 1993, 1995, 2009 and 2010.

'Middle Sunday' at Wimbledon is traditionally a rest day, with no tennis played at all before the entire fourth round is played on 'Manic' Monday. However, due to a rain-congested schedule, there are four years in which play has taken place on Middle Sunday: 1991, 1997, 2007 and 2016.


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Wimbledon records and stats: Greatest champions, most titles, fastest serves and more from The Championships

Roger Federer holds the record for most men's Wimbledon titles in the Open Era but who has struck the most aces, hit the fastest serve and won Wimbledon saving match point? The best records and statistics from tennis's most iconic event

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